Stumbling onto the Set of ITV’s Victoria!

If you follow me on Instagram, you may have seen that last week, I went down to Falkner Square in the Georgian Quarter of Liverpool with the aim of taking some photos, having come across the square while rushing to a flat viewing a few months prior. What I didn’t expect to find, however, was that the square was being set up for the filming of ITV’s Victoria!

They weren’t filming on the day I wanted to take photos, which sort of worked out for the best for me, because it meant I still got some good, non-Victoria-set shots. But we found out that they would be filming on Monday and Tuesday just gone! We didn’t end up seeing any of the shoots on Monday, when Jenna Coleman was there, because we’d already decided to visit Formby Beach, so on Tuesday we toddled off down to see what was happening. ‘Toddled’ being the appropriate word for me, because I had very sunburned feet from the beach and my shoes were still full of sand.

I wasn’t really sure what I was expecting, but what we found did not disappoint. Lots of extras in Victorian dress, an abundance of beautiful horses, and Prince Albert himself, Tom Hughes!

The first scene we saw being shot involved what looked like a war scene… We spent a while trying to guess what it could have been, but we saw a few takes of Tom Hughes and a soldier having a chat while the others bustled around them.

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As someone who one day would really love to work on sets like this, it was fascinating to me to watch what happened between shoots. As soon as they’d finished with that first scene, everyone behind the cameras jumped into action to prepare for the next. A fire engine had been parked nearby, and it moved up so they could use the hose to make the roads, which had been packed with a muddy-looking substance over the usual tarmac, look like it had been raining (something that surprisingly hadn’t happened in about a week).

A woman was busy telling all the extras where to stand, what to do, and when to do it. Horse-drawn carriages which had been parked up and down the roads started moving into place. Camera equipment was shimmied around. Tom Hughes stood in a doorway having a chat.

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It was amazing to see the landscape transform before our eyes, that’s for sure. And seeing carriages and people in Victorian dress standing next to huge light boxes and a modern fire engine was a bit of a trip!

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They took a few shots of some carriages driving by each other, the extras bustling along on the pavements. It was fun watching the horses – I don’t know about you, but I’ve always loved them.

After the street shoots, everything died down pretty quick – we assume for a lunch break, because we wandered down the street to find a string of people in Victorian dress queuing outside a building where everyone was coming out with cake. (It looked like good cake.) But we did notice Tom Hughes run over to the kid crouched in the photo above to give him a high five before everyone went off for food, which was just really cute.

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When the filming looked like it had finished, we got the opportunity to walk across the set for a bit – I mean, nobody told us we could, but nobody stopped us either… We were just curious! But it was pretty cool.

This is one thing I love about living in a city like this, especially because a lot of filming happens in Liverpool because it can easily be made to look like both London and New York. James Corden and Paul McCartney were actually wandering around together the other day in the city centre and by Smithdown, filming Carpool Karaoke!

Until next time…

My First Time at a Northwestern Beach!

I’ve been spending over half of my time at Liverpool since autumn 2016 while I complete my studies at university here, and one thing I had never managed to do in that time was visit a beach up here. Well, no more! Last Monday, I and two housemates hopped on a train to Formby Beach.

We actually hopped on two of the same train, in the end – we didn’t realise that you have to go one stop further than Formby, to Freshfield, to get to the beach at first… the nice man at the station told us we were one stop short!

The beach was about a kilometre’s walk from the station, which was pretty much in one straight line down the road, and then we walked in through the National Trust entrance. We hadn’t really looked up what was at the beach before going, having heard by word of mouth that it was good, so it was a nice surprise to find out how much forestry there was around it.

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The photo above was from the side of the car park. It was a beautifully sunny day, which was a bit of a surprise – it was far warmer than the forecast had predicted! On the opposite side of the car park to these trees, however, there was an ice cream van situated by a sign pointing towards the beach. After a quick stop for my friends to grab an ice cream each while I took photos, we dutifully ambled past the sign and into the trees.

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It turned out we took quite the nature walk before arriving at the beach! There weren’t really any signs once you got into the forest, although after about ten minutes, we did find a fallen tree by the side of the path, on which was painted ‘BEACH’ with an arrow pointing to the left. With my friends busying themselves with their ice creams, they basically followed my lead as I assumed that as long as I followed the fence, we’d probably arrive at the beach at some point…

… and then I got Google maps out when they lost faith in my leadership. But we were going the right way! We just needed a little assistance at the end.

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We emerged from the trees into a series of sand dunes, which I won’t lie, got me a bit excited. As a former geography student whose field trips were largely situated on beaches with sand dunes, it had been a while! I got very picture-happy and sort of rushed off ahead, both in search of the actual sea and just because I felt like it. My friends did decide to call me Dora (the Explorer) for the rest of the day, though…

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In the distance, we could see the wind turbines from the Burbo Bank offshore wind farm. I know some people don’t like them, but I really do – both because of the clean energy they produce, and because I think they look quite serene. They could definitely have designed uglier turbines, that’s for sure.

We’re fairly certain the land mass we could see in the distance to the left, some distance behind the wind turbines, was Wales, and according to the GPS on my phone, we were actually directly across from Dublin. (Couldn’t see it, of course, but it was nice to know.)

We put our towels down on the flat sand at first to eat lunch, because we were all really hungry by then, but we were on the north west coast of England, so there was a fair amount of wind chill! So, once we’d eaten with the sea view in front of us, we retreated back into the dunes so we were protected from the wind a little more.

At this point, none of our phones had any signal, which was a bit of an odd sensation considering we weren’t that far from civilisation. But seeing as we’re all arts and humanities students, we’d all packed a book each to take with us, so we spent a good few hours switching between reading and chatting (and, in my case, wandering up and down the dunes).

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Around half four in the afternoon, we decided we probably ought to start heading back from the beach in order to find food. We weren’t exactly sure on which direction we had come from, so we proved just how youth-in-the-21st-century we were and had to rely on the GPS telling us which direction we were facing while I led us to the car park – at which point, we discovered a far easier route to/from the beach than the one we’d taken! But what’s life without a bit of adventure?

All in all, it wasn’t quite what I’d expected from my first time visiting a northwestern beach in England. I had harboured suspicion that there’d be more touristy shops like the ones you’ll find at many south coast beaches, where you can get buckets and spades etc., but I suppose that’s unlikely at a National Trust reserve! And I’d also expected rather worse weather and rougher tides, though I’m sure on a day with worse luck that’s probably what you would find… What actually happened was that I got very sunburned feet.

So that’s that! I leave you with this: it turns out northwestern beaches in England can actually be far more pleasant than you might expect, and never put your sun lotion on while wearing socks unless you’re 100% certain you won’t be taking the socks off.