The Pros: Would I Recommend Going to Uni?

It’s been more than three years since I left home at 18 and moved to a city 200 miles away that I’d spent little more than a couple of hours in. It was the start of my university career: one that saw me write countless essays, meet new people, have many ups and downs as far as my health was concerned, learn far more than I can currently remember, and spend a little too much money on books. So, with a little distance between my final deadline back in May and now, I thought I’d write two posts about the experience: the pros, and the cons. This, obviously, is the pros post. Here I’ll share what I loved about going to university, and some of the things you might be able to look forward to – or reminisce upon – about your own time at university.

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That ‘Uni Lifestyle’

In the months, and sometimes years, before heading off to university you hear many things. To name but a few: it’ll be the best years of your life, you’ll spend a lot of time partying (and a lot of time hungover), and you’ll meet friends you’ll have for the rest of your life.

Is it all true? No, not inevitably. Is there some truth to it? Sure! I loved moving to university, and leaving my old home behind. It was an adventure I’d been looking forward to for years, and I felt ready for it. I wanted the independence, I wanted to meet new people, experience new things, and live somewhere else. I got all of that. University is one of the biggest, most readily available opportunities for you to find a complete new start; a new environment, new people, the ability to make plenty of new impressions. Plus, freshers week? Basically a week to practice making your new first impressions over and over again before you really start to meet people the following week. Who could ask for more?

And now I’m going to try to stop saying ‘new’ for a minute.

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One of the biggest factors you’ll consider when choosing to go to university will be the course. What you’ll spend your life studying or working for for the next three years (or more). You need to choose the course that is right for you, because if you like the course, you won’t mind doing the work for it. Dare I say it, you might even look forward to the work. A degree is an intense undertaking for most people and if you aren’t willing to work for it, you likely won’t finish it. So be as sure as you can, and it’ll make the hours in the library worth it.

Luckily, there is plenty of choice out there, so there probably is something for you. Some of my best memories of university are to do with the modules on my course. I studied English and History joint honours, so I had two departments to contend with. One of my first modules at university was an English Language module, much of which studied differences in regional accents and pronunciation. And as the 200-odd students in the room came from all over, every lecture was punctuated by the murmurs of students asking whoever was next to them to say something and laughing at the response. It’s not the worst way to bond, y’know.

DSC01332.jpgOther fond course memories come from a module where I basically learned about ghost stories instead of the civil war I was technically meant to be learning about; a module where I learned that in the middle ages it wasn’t unheard of for rats to be issued with court dates; and a module where I spent hours watching films in a language I couldn’t understand, a friend translating where she could.

The People

As I said earlier, going to university is the perfect opportunity to meet people – and to get used to meeting people. We all know it can be a hard thing to do, but simply starting a conversation with the person next to you by saying “hi” can do you well. It can feel strange, because almost as soon as you get to university you need to think about who you want to live with the following year, so you often agree to move in with people before you know them particularly well. Some friendships will last and sometimes you might end up with a housemate you can’t wait to leave behind, but it’ll all be valuable life experience.

And let’s not forget, while you’ll come away from university having experienced some weird things and encountered some weird people (I can guarantee you this much), all of those encounters will turn into stories you’ll look back at with amusement. For example, one of my first year flatmates claimed to have a phobia of shiny things and ended up somehow melting a neon green plastic piece of cutlery in the oven without noticing it. Extremely weird both then and now, but an anecdote which never fails to make people laugh.

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The whiteboards on our fridge in my first year flat were home to many a weird conversation

The Perfect Time to Be Selfish & Try New Things

Another thing about university is it’s the perfect time to focus a little more on you and what you want to do. It’s probably one of the best times to consider getting yourself a gym membership; universities sometimes give their students free memberships, often discounted ones, and local gyms regularly provide student rates. In my first year I was a member of a city gym near my flat; it was roughly equidistant to the university gym but cheaper and 24/7, so it was a little more flexible. In my second and third years, I moved to the other side of campus, so the university gym was nearest and I went there. With the flexible schedules most students have at university, it’s remarkably easy to fit in regular workouts if that’s what you want. And why wouldn’t you – increase your fitness, counteract the countless hours spent sitting down studying, great for your mental health…

Aside from exercise, university gives you the opportunity to explore many other things; you can try new activities wherever you live, take advantage of events the university runs, join societies… In my first year I had the opportunity to attend a radio recording at the BBC in Media City. A friend and I both came to the conclusion that we weren’t good enough at exploring Liverpool and the surrounding area during the semester, so after the January exams and summer exams we’d set aside a few days or a long weekend to do nothing but explore. It was a great help that northern trains are so cheap – I mean, £5 return for an hour’s journey each way? Yes please! Where I live, an 11 minute journey each way will set you back about £7.

Other opportunities I took advantage of included: attending John Boyne’s book launch for The Heart’s Invisible Furies; seeing ITV’s Victoria being filmed near campus (not something the university advertised, but something I stumbled across); and going to Haworth to see the Bronte parsonage and write in the special copy of Wuthering Heights that was created for Emily Bronte’s 200th birthday.

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One of the BBC buildings in Media City, Salford
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Writing in the handwritten Wuthering Heights manuscript for Emily Bronte’s 200th

A Trial Run at Adulthood

Going to university and living away from home is a little like a trial run at full adulthood. Budgeting, cooking, cleaning, getting yourself to lectures etc on time, figuring out how to self-motivate, dealing with landlords and agencies, finding places to live, finding your favourite supermarket, remembering when to put the bins out… All with just a little less pressure. By the time you’ve graduated, you’ll be ready and eager to start your fully adult life.

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So, that’s that for this blog post – all my pros about going to university! Soon will be the second post about the not-so-enjoyable parts, and whether they might outweigh everything in this post. Keep an eye out!

A Week in Scotland: Loch Lomond & Loch Fyne

If you follow me on my Instagram, you might have seen that last month I went on my first holiday in a long time. We stayed in a lodge at Cameron House on Loch Lomond, Scotland (which made the news at the end of 2017 for a bad fire in the main house, which is still being rebuilt).

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I can’t tell you how ready I was to spend some real time outside, surrounded by beautiful scenery. Having spent 3 years living in a city centre, I was definitely in the mood for some fresh, fresh air. And for that, where better to go than Scotland?

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If you know me, you know that I have a particular love for trees, which made the scenes around Cameron House perfect for warming my heart. There’s just something about trees, and forests in particular, which have such magic imbibed into them. Why else would so much European folklore take place in forests? So, of course, my camera came everywhere.

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Early on in the week, we went on the Loch Lomond ferry tour – an hour long trip around the lake, to admire its beauty from all angles. The weather happened to be really moody when we went, but stayed just clear enough that we had some really spectacular views of the lake and the surrounding hills – and I think I was just about able to capture some of it on camera. If you visit the loch, I’d recommend the ferry trip any day.

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The next place I’d recommend? Loch Fyne. You might have heard of the restaurant chain – well, this is where it originates. We were fortunate enough to have an absolutely gorgeous day when we visited; the entire lake was crystal clear and, well, the photos speak for themselves. Quaint little boats, lots of seaweed as it’s a salt water lake, and absolutely stunning hills to boot.

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In fact, the photos from this particular day have been keeping my Instagram going for a while. Each angle had something different to offer, and it was truly spectacular to have it all right in front of you. Behind us was the town of Inveraray, site of Inveraray Castle and Inverarary Jail. The castle has a history dating back to the 1400s, though the building itself is more recent, and has some beautifully maintained grounds. The jail, which housed adults and children alike, allows visitors to walk into the old cells, while the audio guide explains what barbaric punishments and terrible conditions prisoners had to endure when it was in use – it has been closed since 1889. It may sound bleak, but if you’re a history geek like I am, it’s definitely worth a visit.

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The third and final place I’ll mention in this post is The Hill House. No, not related to the book, the films or the Netflix series about a haunted house. This is simply… a house on a hill. Except, it’s a bit more intriguing than that: the National Trust have taken care of this house because, built in the Victorian Era, it was created with an extremely out-of-the-norm art-deco style. Unfortunately, the man who had the house built didn’t quite take into account the amount of rain the house would have to endure, and so it’s always had a perennial damp problem. The solution? A really, really big box.

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Under the great metal cage lies the house, turrets and pebble-dash and all, and the strange opportunity to walk not only through the house, but over it as well. The outside seemed to me to be rather unassuming, but the inside was unexpectedly light and airy, though unfortunately I didn’t take many photos so I can’t show you here. Take my word for it – it is like one ginormous art piece; from the walls to the doors to the furniture, everything is carefully selected and feels oddly ahead of its time. Me being me, of course, I managed to whack my head on one of the metal wall lights while admiring the piano. Tall and clumsy, anyone? No? Just me? Cool.

So, that pretty much concludes this long-overdue blog post. We weren’t too concerned with rushing here, there and everywhere on this holiday, so we had a couple of quiet days as well. I even got into a swimming pool for the first time in years – though in order for that to happen we did dedicate an entire day to finding me a bikini… But it isn’t the time or place for that story! Either way, I’ll always maintain the relief from finding yourself some quiet time outside, surrounded by nature, is never to be underestimated.

Where was the last place you went on holiday?

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A Trip to Kew Gardens

On Saturday 3rd September, I finally went on my trip to Kew Gardens. I was given a voucher for free entry for two people for Christmas last year and was meant to go during August initially, but because of work and then results and being busy sorting out things for university, it didn’t happen. But, finally, I found a good time to go.

I was so annoyed with myself when I was about half way there (it took us not too far off two hours to get there, despite living just above London), because I realised that despite thinking about this trip for months and knowing I’d blog about it, I forgot my camera. I mean, it wasn’t a total disaster because I still had my phone with me, which has a pretty decent camera, but still. My actual camera would have been better, so if these pictures aren’t quite up to standard, please forgive me…

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I decided to go with my mum, because we are quite close, and it seemed like a nice thing to do before I go to university and might not see her for three months at a time as I’m going 200 miles away, so can’t just pop home every other week. It turned out to be a really nice day, though it wasn’t the gorgeous sunny day we’d have had back in August, and it started raining towards the end of our day. But, to be quite honest, we didn’t mind walking in the rain.

IMG_20160903_133034Kew Gardens is, no doubt about it, beautiful. I didn’t really know anything about it before, but really there’s not that much to know – it’s a beautiful area in London full of plants from around the world, amazing trees, good food (though a little expensive) and makes for a great picture day. I’m not ashamed to say, the day did involve a little tree hugging, and we also named some of the more impressive trees – meet Cecil the Chestnut:

Cecil the ChestnutOne thing I really loved was that they have a lot of things around in support of bees, which are fast becoming endangered, and that’s not good for humanity or the planet. Plus, bees are so cute. They just buzz around, keeping to themselves unless they sense they’re in danger. Best rule when it comes to bees? Leave them to themselves, and you’ll get on great.

Plus, it was nice to see the gardens at the turn of the season; it’s just starting to become autumnal, the leaves are beginning to turn, and starting to fall. I feel like it’s the time when the colours are becoming really rich, but the temperature hasn’t fallen too much yet. It makes me excited for the two months to come, when the conkers drop and we can bring out the scarves and hats again, and I can finally start wearing rich autumn colours again.

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The treetop walkway was brilliant – it was during this that it started to rain properly, and it got a bit blustery (I cannot use that word without thinking of Winnie-the-Pooh), which made the walkway sway from side to side without warning. It was fun to look out at the tops of the trees and walk through them. Trees look amazing from above.

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So, that was my day. I hope you liked the pictures – I definitely recommend going to Kew Gardens if you get the opportunity. I know I’ll be going back; I really want to see the trees in all seasons, they’re so beautiful. And plus, it’s a place without all the litter or buildings of the rest of London. (You do get planes headed to land at Heathrow flying overhead, but it’s easily ignored.) I wish I could go towards the end of October, actually, at the height of autumn when all the trees will be shades of orange and brown… Oh well. I’ll definitely be visiting again at some point!

Katy x