Week in Lanzarote

On 20th June, I had an evening flight to Lanzarote for my post-exams, end-of-school holiday with two friends. It’s safe to say I was pretty excited; this was my first holiday without parents (I mean, I’ve been on school trips but you’ve still got teachers shimmying you around at that point). We just went for the week, Monday to Monday, but it was so much fun.

Lanzarote 2016 (1)

The sunset from the air was beautiful, as you can see, and we arrived at our hotel some time past midnight on Tuesday morning.

The first couple of days were pretty chill, just beach and pool days, reading, playing games; we got the shopping done (self-catering accommodation) and whatever else. Two of us rented a pedalo on the beach for an hour, which was amazingly fun. Here’s the view from the pedalo back at the shore from Playa Grande:

Lanza Camera (16)

Thursday was a big day: we had a Grand Tour of the island. I’d only slept four hours the previous night, having been awake from about 1am to 5am, but – weirdly – I was still feeling pretty energetic. We were on a bus and ready to go by 9:15, and met a very nice woman from Belarus who currently lives in Moscow and was travelling on her own.

Funnily enough, on our trip round the Spanish island, we had a Belgian tour guide who was taking the tour in English and French.

On this tour we saw camels in abundance – there were literally hundreds of them – many volcanoes (dormant) and some geothermal experiments and lots round the Timanfaya National Park.

When we got back later that night, we stayed up to watch the first of the EU referendum results come in and went to bed. Of course, then, the following morning we spent a couple of hours watching the chaotic aftermath of the referendum’s results.

Come Saturday it was time for another excursion, this time to Fuerteventura, a neighbouring Canary Island. I’ve actually been here before, but only when I was four, so it wasn’t like it was familiar. We had a ferry trip there and back, only half an hour each way, and it was another coach tour.

At Fuerteventura, we stopped at an Aloe Vera cosmetics place, had some photo stops, lunch in a little village, went to another few places and learned a bit of the history of the island, and our last stop was at some sand dunes – after my exhausting field trip to sand dunes for my A Level course last March, it was a welcome relief to see these weren’t covered in bracken and heather.

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Not my hand. It belonged to the coach driver.

On Sunday we went to the Rancho Texas park, which we’d seen online and thought would make a good place to spend some time. It was a pretty small zoo, but it was still a nice time. We watched a bird show and a sea lion show (I’m still not sure I approve of those) but it was nice to see some farm animals too. So British.

Our last day was pretty much like our first day, just a pool and relax day before we headed to the town for dinner and eventually the airport for another night flight back home. It was a pretty long travel all in all – we’d been up since 8am on Monday and I only arrived home just before 6am on Tuesday, having had no sleep in between. I fell asleep on the sofa just before my dad got up for work.

All in all, it was a great week. We got around a fair amount, though I’ve skated over some of the less interesting days for you, but I would recommend visiting the Canary Islands. The weather was beautiful the entire week, a welcome reprieve from the rain in the UK, and I know there was plenty more to do we didn’t even manage. Hope you like the photos!

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Am I an Adult Yet?

I’ve left school! Am I an adult yet?

Yeah, I turned 18 last year but still. The boundaries of school life… never felt like an actual adult. My last exam was the day before yesterday, and it went pretty bad, but then I went out to the cinema with friends and watched Alice Through the Looking Glass (which was awesome and amazingly colourful).

My idea of being an adult has always been some idea of having a job, a relationship, real responsibilities… something more like one of my cousins (most of them are older than me). And I know legally you’re an adult at 18, but I don’t think anyone really is an adult until wayyyyy later on.

At the moment, I don’t have a job. I definitely don’t have a relationship. There isn’t much in the way of responsibilities.

I can drive, but that’s not much of a development – I started lessons the day after my 17th birthday and passed four months later, so I’ve been driving for well over a year now. I don’t own a car, I just drive my dad’s.

Maybe it’s different for people who don’t go to university like I’m planning to, or people in more unfortunate circumstances… young carers are probably far more adult than I am, for instance.

Maybe it’s something to do with independence. I don’t feel like I have much independence. Living at home, relying on parents for financial support. I think once that’s gone, then I’ll feel like an adult, but just because I’ve left education? Nahh.

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This is likely to be the last blog post until 30th June, because I’m going away for a bit! So no uploads the next Thursday and Sunday, but I’ll be back after that. See ya later!

One Meal for the Rest of Your Life

I doubt anyone knows why, but as humans we seem to have a fascination with asking “if you could only have/do/eat/drink one thing for the rest of your life, what would it be?” Me and my friend have this down.

I say pizza. She says salad. Both are brilliant options.

Pizza doesn’t have to be unhealthy, and I don’t know why people think it does, to be honest. It’s one of the most versatile meals in the world, because really its only restriction is that it’s a base of something with some toppings of something else.

You can make a standard, unhealthy, Dominos pizza, sure. But you can also make a cauliflower base pizza with fresh tomato sauce and vegetables. And that’s why I’d choose pizza for the rest of my life, because it can be absolutely anything. Savoury pizza, sweet pizza, protein-packed pizza, cheese feast pizza. Vegetarian, meat-eater, pescetarian, vegan. Pizza can literally work for any diet.

Having said that, salad also works on pretty much the same principle. Savoury salad? Leaves, croutons, veggies – sorted. Sweet salad? FRUIT SALAD. And again, you can add meat, fish, whatever.

Personally I prefer my choice. I think pizza beats salad any day. You can put salad on top of pizza. Plus, I feel like it’s easier to incorporate cheese into a pizza than into a salad, and I cannot live without some cheese. I love that stuff.

One of my favourite meals that takes a bit more effort than my usual “shove in the oven and boil on the top” process is a cauliflower base pizza like I mentioned above, which I actually was inspired to do by a YouTube video with Niomi Smart and Marcus Butler a while back – probably about two years ago.

Anyway, that’s my take on the question. What would you choose?

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